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Piechowski's Role.

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1). Overview.

Over the years, Michael Piechowski has advanced his own interpretation of Dąbrowski's theory and proposed significant changes to several key components of the theory. Dr. Piechowski’s views have evolved over time and continue to evolve. My purpose here is to delineate these differences and trace their history as they emerged.

I have been a staunch advocate for the theory as Dąbrowski proposed it. My role has occasionally been characterized as a personal argument with Dr. Piechowski. This is not the case, the conflict is between Dr. Piechowski's verses Dr. Dąbrowski's views and, historically, my role has been to highlight these issues. I have never advocated one way or the other for Dr. Piechowski's position; I have consistently asked him to clearly differentiate his ideas and summarize his own ideas in his own theory of development. Dr. Piechowski says he has “not presented a theory of his own and will not put forth [his own] theory.” He is “simply updating” TPD and “correcting errors.”

I would also note the uniqueness of Dr. Piechowski's interpretations. In reviewing the literature on Dąbrowski, the views of Dr. Piechowski, and those who reference him, stand in stark contrast; for example, his views of the average person being at level II are not reflected in the contemporary literature. Stupak & Dyga (2018, p. 790) illustrated the original description of level I as Dąbrowski formulated it: “According to Dąbrowski (1986), average people and psychopaths find themselves on the lowest possible level of psychological development and personality structure. This is termed 'primary integration,' and those at this stage are described as unconscious, lacking a hierarchy of values, and influenced primarily by biological and environmental forces. As a hierarchy of values is absent on this level, these people rarely experience inner conflicts over their values or their actions.”

Stupak, R., & Dyga, K. (2018). Postpsychiatry and postmodern psychotherapy: Theoretical and ethical issues in mental health care in a Polish context. Theory & Psychology, 28(6), 780-799. https://doi.org/10.1177/0959354318802973

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2). Tillier - Piechowski point/counterpoint.

Frank, J., Curties, H., & Finlay, G. (Eds.). (2009). Imagining the way: Proceedings from the 19th Annual SAGE Conference. Unpublished Manuscript. (Proceedings from the 19th Annual SAGE Conference. November 7-8, 2008, University of Calgary, Calgary AB.).

Mendaglio, S. (2009). Point-Counter Point. In J. Frank, H. Curties, & G. Finlay, (Eds.). Imagining the way: Proceedings from the 19th Annual SAGE Conference (p. 69). Unpublished Manuscript. (Proceedings from the 19th Annual SAGE Conference. November 7-8, 2008, University of Calgary, Calgary AB.).

Piechowski, M. M. (2009). Piechowski's response to William Tillier's "Conceptual differences between Piechowski and Dąbrowski" In J. Frank, H. Curties, & G. Finlay, (Eds.). Imagining the way: Proceedings from the 19th Annual SAGE Conference (pp. 70 - 74). Unpublished Manuscript. (Proceedings from the 19th Annual SAGE Conference. November 7-8, 2008, University of Calgary, Calgary AB.).

Tillier, W. (2009). Conceptual differences between Piechowski and Dąbrowski. In J. Frank, H. Curties, & G. Finlay, (Eds.). Imagining the way: Proceedings from the 19th Annual SAGE Conference (pp. 60 - 68). Unpublished Manuscript. (Proceedings from the 19th Annual SAGE Conference. November 7-8, 2008, University of Calgary, Calgary AB.).

Tillier, W. (2009). Tillier's response to Piechowski. In J. Frank, H. Curties, & G. Finlay, (Eds.). Imagining the way: Proceedings from the 19th Annual SAGE Conference (pp. 75 - 77). Unpublished Manuscript. (Proceedings from the 19th Annual SAGE Conference. November 7-8, 2008, University of Calgary, Calgary AB.).

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3). 1977 Book Issues.

This presentation of the issues related to the 1977 books was updated in 2018. It was reviewed by Michael Piechowski for accuracy and he made several comments that were incorporated into the final version. The assistance of Chris Wells was appreciated and is acknowledged.

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4). For a full account:

This presentation was updated in 2018. It was reviewed by Michael Piechowski for accuracy and he made several comments that were incorporated into the final version. The assistance of Chris Wells was appreciated and is acknowledged.

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5). Also see:

This comprehensive introduction to Dąbrowski contains a section on Maslow pertinent to this discussion: Dąbrowski 201.

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